January 2019, Volume XXXII, No 10

Medicus

Ali Salavati, MD, MPH, a resident in the University of Minnesota Medical School’s department of radiology, has received a 2018 RSNA Trainee Research Prize from the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). Salavati received the award for his research titled, “Detection Rate of 18F-FACBE (Fluciclovine) PET/CT Scan as a Function of Prostatic Specific Antigen (PSA) Level: Initial Experience of 76 Patients with Biochemically Recurrent Prostate Cancer.” Each subcommittee of the program committee may award three prizes each year—one prize for the best paper or scientific poster submitted by a resident or physics trainee, one prize for the best paper or poster submitted by a fellow, and one prize for the best paper or poster submitted by a medical student. The Trainee Research Prize consists of $1,000 and a certificate indicating the name of the trainee and the title of the paper or poster.

David Beckmann, MD, has been hired as District One Hospital’s first dedicated hospitalist, where his primary professional focus is the general medical care of hospitalized patients. Beckmann is an experienced physician with decades of clinical practice. He began at the Faribault Clinic after his residency in 1987 and has practiced internal medicine in Faribault in the clinic and hospital for 31 years. He earned his medical degree at Mayo Medical School.

Robert M. Jacobson, MD, professor of pediatrics in the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and pediatrician in the Mayo Clinic Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, has received Minnesota’s 2018 HPV Vaccine is Cancer Prevention Champion Award, which is led jointly by the CDC, the Association of American Cancer Institutes, and the American Cancer Society. According to the Minnesota Department of Health, uptake of the vaccine, which is recommended for adolescents at age 11-12, has lagged far behind the other recommended vaccines for the age group—only about 19.5 percent of 13- to 15- year-olds have completed the recommended HPV vaccine series in Minnesota. However, among Jacobson’s patients ages 13-15 seen in the last 24 months, 71.2 percent have completed the HPV vaccine series. Since the vaccine was introduced in 2006, Jacobson has worked to help improve rates by giving trainings and presentations to colleagues on how to strongly recommend the vaccine and have conversations with vaccine-hesitant parents; leading Mayo Clinic’s efforts to train pediatric residents in addressing vaccine hesitancy using a simulation training so they can practice conversations with parents; and serving on workgroups and advisory committees to advance best vaccination practices. Jacobson earned his medical degree at the University of Chicago. 

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Robert M. Jacobson, MD, professor of pediatrics in the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and pediatrician in the Mayo Clinic Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, has received Minnesota’s 2018 HPV Vaccine is Cancer Prevention Champion Award, which is led jointly by the CDC, the Association of American Cancer Institutes, and the American Cancer Society. According to the Minnesota Department of Health, uptake of the vaccine, which is recommended for adolescents at age 11-12, has lagged far behind the other recommended vaccines for the age group—only about 19.5 percent of 13- to 15- year-olds have completed the recommended HPV vaccine series in Minnesota. However, among Jacobson’s patients ages 13-15 seen in the last 24 months, 71.2 percent have completed the HPV vaccine series. Since the vaccine was introduced in 2006, Jacobson has worked to help improve rates by giving trainings and presentations to colleagues on how to strongly recommend the vaccine and have conversations with vaccine-hesitant parents; leading Mayo Clinic’s efforts to train pediatric residents in addressing vaccine hesitancy using a simulation training so they can practice conversations with parents; and serving on workgroups and advisory committees to advance best vaccination practices. Jacobson earned his medical degree at the University of Chicago.