December 2018, Volume XXXII, No 9

Medicus

Judith Eckerle, MD, director of the Adoption Medicine Clinic at the University of Minnesota Medical School, has been nominated as a 2018 Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute Angels in Adoption Honoree for her work with international and domestically adopted and foster care children in Minnesota. Eckerle has been on the forefront of change with her research and clinical care as well as her advocacy for change in adoption policy. Currently, she says the clinic is embarking on a partnership grant with the Minnesota Department of Human Survives for the next four years that could double their capacity. She was nominated by U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar and joined other nominees in Washington, D.C., to meet with governmental leaders. Eckerle earned her medical degree at the Medical College of Wisconsin.

Kelly Han, MD, director of advanced congenital cardiac imaging at the Minneapolis Heart Institute and Children’s Heart Clinic at Minnesota Children’s Hospital, has been selected as the first recipient of The Jon DeHaan Foundation Award for Innovation in Cardiology. She is being recognized for making significant contributions to improving the safety and quality of imaging congenital heart disease and treating and caring for adult women with congenital heart disease who either want to become pregnant or have become pregnant. Han received $200,000 as part of the award to expand services, research, and care. She earned her medical degree at the University of Wisconsin Medical School.

Kejal Kantarci, MD, MS, and David T. Jones, MD, of Mayo Clinic have received de Leon Prizes in Neuroimaging from the Alzheimer’s Association. The awards are presented to those who are judged to have published the best paper in their peer group in any peer-reviewed journal on the topic of advanced medical imaging to show diseases that affect or destroy nerve cells in the brains of people with diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and ALS. Kantarci, director of the neuroimaging core of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center and professor of radiology, received the Senior Scientist de Leon Prize for her paper “White Matter Integrity on DTI and the Pathologic Staging of Alzheimer’s Disease,” published in Neurology of Aging in August 2017. Her research focuses on using advanced brain imaging technology for early diagnosis of dementia in patients. She earned her medical degree at Marmara University School of Medicine. Jones, senior associate consultant in the department of neurology and assistant professor of neurology and radiology at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science, received the New Investigator de Leon Prize for his paper “Tau, Amyloid, and Cascading Network Failure Across the Alzheimer’s Disease Spectrum,” published in Cortex in December 2017. His research focuses on developing methods to derive measurements of brain connectivity and to evaluate their potential as biomarkers in healthy aging and diseases such as Alzheimer’s and other dementias. Jones earned his medical degree at Georgetown University School of Medicine. 

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Kejal Kantarci, MD, MS, and David T. Jones, MD, of Mayo Clinic have received de Leon Prizes in Neuroimaging from the Alzheimer’s Association. The awards are presented to those who are judged to have published the best paper in their peer group in any peer-reviewed journal on the topic of advanced medical imaging to show diseases that affect or destroy nerve cells in the brains of people with diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and ALS. Kantarci, director of the neuroimaging core of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center and professor of radiology, received the Senior Scientist de Leon Prize for her paper “White Matter Integrity on DTI and the Pathologic Staging of Alzheimer’s Disease,” published in Neurology of Aging in August 2017. Her research focuses on using advanced brain imaging technology for early diagnosis of dementia in patients. She earned her medical degree at Marmara University School of Medicine. Jones, senior associate consultant in the department of neurology and assistant professor of neurology and radiology at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science, received the New Investigator de Leon Prize for his paper “Tau, Amyloid, and Cascading Network Failure Across the Alzheimer’s Disease Spectrum,” published in Cortex in December 2017. His research focuses on developing methods to derive measurements of brain connectivity and to evaluate their potential as biomarkers in healthy aging and diseases such as Alzheimer’s and other dementias. Jones earned his medical degree at Georgetown University School of Medicine.